A History of Planning in 50 Objects

We’re going to source 50 plus objects that represent planning over the years, ideally one for each year if that is possible.

They have to be actual objects, not concepts; but anything you can photograph should count.  U-matic machines, copies of Sharp Stick and trophies all count.  The more culturally and strategically relevant they are the better; humour is not discouraged.  

If you would like to contribute, this is what you have to do:

  • Choose and name your object

  • Headline your contribution

  • Write up to 50 words about why it’s significant

  • Include a picture and the date it was used or launched

Either email Sarah directly or fill in the form below. You can also upload your nomination to our designated page on Reddit.

Please note that any nominations for books will be put on hold for the time being as we are looking for more objects.

 
(All contributions will be attributed to the nominee).

Adrian Langford

The original How Brands Grow

1959

Original paper published by Andrew Ehrenberg, establishing the central principles popularised over fifty years later by Byron Sharp. Remarkable not only for the fact that it was there all along (but densely mathematical), but also that it was published in a statistical not market research journal.

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

Matt Gladstone

Soap Wars, fought on emotion

1960

It was my first Laundry focus group. A room divided by brands: Ariel, claimed by those who wanted performance, certainty; Persil, by the middle-class-dreamers, thinking of muddy children returning from a suburban garden. 40+ years of constructed meaning. Built by insight & advertising. A planner's text book brought to life.

Planning Partner at Grey London

John Griffiths

Way out projective tasks Peter Cooper and CRAM

1963

The adoption of discussion groups by planners to develop advertising spawned a research industry. But there were always high end practitioners who pushed the envelope big time. Chief among them was Peter Cooper founder of CRAM. Respondents in his groups modelled clay (John Major election 1992, made psycho drawings Guinness 1985 and described dairy brands in terms of what it would be like if it were a breast 1983. Penises and vaginas loomed large in his debriefs. Planners had to turn these kind of debrief into ad briefs! Peter WAS brilliant and inspired ground breaking work

CEO Founder at Planning Above & Beyond

Charlie Brenninkmeijer

A Pint

1967

How many briefs, ideas or debates about the effectiveness of pre-testing have started and been fuelled by a pint (or three)? It's had its place at the heart of the advertising community since the beginning, bringing people together to spark creativity - and, occasionally, pulling people apart.

Senior Planner at Grey London

Anna Thairs

The TGI Survey from Kantar

1969

I have a deep-seated love TGI. Whether offline or online – it’s a magnificent beast that has been instrumental in helping me get to grips with understanding consumers (and for pulling the odd useful stat on how many pints a week people drink).

Planner at Grey London

John Griffiths

The Philips audio cassette - used once then stored for 5 years

1970

The Philips audio cassette was the default way qualitative data was captured, and the final arbiter of what it meant; complete with hesitations and shifts in the emotional climate of the participants. On an early digital audio editing course researchers were shown how to edit mp3 files to cut out those pesky silences and make a great audio quote for PowerPoint. An eminent researcher protested. Don’t cut the silences. That’s the most important bit!

CEO Founder at Planning Above & Beyond

John Griffiths

Umatic Video Recorder

1970

Creative research jump started the qualitative research industry. Animatics or keyframes with a soundtrack was the closest way to convey the idea behind a TV script. The planners carried these monsters into living rooms to test advertising ideas. At BMP the argument ran that women couldn’t be planners because they couldn’t heft the Umatic off trains and taxis. Till Jane Newman proved them wrong.

CEO Founder at Planning Above & Beyond

J. Walter Thompson

What is a brand?

1971

The paper, written by Stephen King in 1971, is the most definitive explanation of what our industry is here to do: build the long-term value of brands. In it, he highlights the importance of knowledge and commercial understanding, as well as long-term thinking, to create truly effective work for our Clients.

John Griffiths

First application of planning outside advertising

1973

Applying planning thinking outside of advertising came only 5 years after its founding. Using hand compiled statistics typed by his wife, Peter Jones developed a parallel business while at BMP to use planning thinking to determine which horses from which stables on which race courses could beat the odds. BMP was always a betting agency. One graduate trainee (also a chess prodigy) was expected to pick the best runners of the day before starting his day job! Peter Jones claims that the Trainer’s Record issued annually for many years was the first ever book about account planning.

CEO Founder at Planning Above & Beyond

J. Walter Thompson

Planning Guide

1974

Created especially for Planners at JWT, Stephen King produced a guide to encourage an innovative approach to Advertising Planning. It was more than just a set of procedures to follow, it stimulated imagination and creativity too.

Adrian Langford

Testing To Destruction

1974

There’s some debate around including books, but this slim tract is the mother lode on creative development research. The account of a woman’s random walk towards buying floor cleaner will leave your neat customer journey in shreds. Over forty years on it’s more relevant than ever.

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

Paul Feldwick

Electronic Calculator (Casio 121-F)

1975

In the pre-spreadsheet 1970s, every planner’s constant companion: for looking at patterns in data from Nielsen and TCA, Usage and Attitude Studies, calculating averages, percentages, sales per point of distribution, graphing it all (with graph paper, pencil and ruler), and of course adding up your expenses...

Consultant and Author

Anna Thairs

The humble sticky note

1977

One of the most helpful pieces of advice I’ve been given is to write out your killer strategic points on sticky notes, and then rearrange them to help find the most effective narrative. I don’t think I’ve seen a planning department not covered in flouro pink and orange.

Planner at Grey London

Paul Feldwick

Advertising Works – the first volume

1980

Edited by Simon Broadbent, with an introduction by Stephen King, these were the first truly rigorous published case studies demonstrating the real business results of advertising. A game changer at the time, but no-one anticipated how far the next four decades of Effectiveness Awards would transform our understanding of how advertising works.

Consultant and Author

Adrian Langford

Marantz PMD222

1980

The video side has been covered, but for those telling verbatims, BMP planners on qualitative duty were armed with these wonderful Marantz recorders. They doubled as alarm clocks - when the time came to turn the tape over it was time to move onto the second script!

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

Adrian Langford

Colour coded BMP coffee mug

1983

BMP operated a simple colour coding system — red for account planning, green for account management, and blue for media (remember when media was in the agency?). It applied to document covers and in this case to mugs. Simpler days.

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

James Best

Hofmeister George The Bear animatic

1983

Animatics were the campaign pre-testing tool used by BMP planners in thousands of focus groups from the 1970s. John Webster crafted them to represent exactly how he envisaged a future TV ad, timed storyboards. Consumers' responses to them guided the planners' development of nearly all his great campaigns, including Hofmeister.

Ex-Chairman and Planner at BMP/DDB

John Shaw

Captain Rik, the hero of Ricicles.

1985

My first project as a planner at JWT was nothing to do with advertising, reflecting how interconnected top agencies then were with client marketing departments. After some research among four- and five-year olds (to call them ‘focus’ groups would have been grossly inaccurate), Captain Rik was born. He flew around the Ricicles pack enthusiastically for over thirty years.

Chief Strategy & Innovation Officer at Superunion

Vaughan Flood

A-Z The Complete Works

1985 - 2005

Vaughan Flood

Founding Director at Flood and Partners

Adrian Langford

HP Plotter — an alternative to ashtrays

1986

The white heat of the technological revolution swept through Bishop's Bridge Road when BMP mated its sole PC with a plotter, copy of Harvard Graphics, and a selection of fibre tipped pens. Prior to that the secretaries created pie charts by laboriously tracing round BMP's Dunhill client ashtrays.

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

Adrian Langford

IBM PC

1986

Boase Massimi Pollitt's very first computer, and acquired by accident through the agency's takeover of the Marketing Solutions company. We didn't actually have any software, so the geekier Simon Silvester hooked it up as a Telmar TGI terminal through the blisteringly slow modem.

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

J. Walter Thompson

The Planning Cycle

1987

Devised by Stephen King, and published in 1987, this tool provides a structured framework for forming hypotheses and creates a continuous process of learning and modification.

Anna Thairs

Powerpoint

1987

PowerPoint gets a lot of undue hate! Yes, its random animations cause decks to go awry. Yes, its drop shadows speak of darker graphic-design times. But PowerPoint helped me figure out how to present my scribbles and ideas in an easy-to-understand way, and its format helps refine long convoluted stories into succinct and convincing narratives.

Planner at Grey London

Adrian Langford

BMP Planning Awayday

1987

Remarkable for the hairstyles as much as how many in this 1987 group are still movers and shakers and thought leaders in the industry over thirty years on — in no order of leadership Paul Feldwick, Guy Murphy, Richard Storey, Mark Earls, Jon Steel, Les Binet, Sarah Carter, Nigel Jones…

Planning Director at J Walter Thompson

J. Walter Thompson

The Consumer's Buying System

1987

Understanding how a brand is bought, used and bought again has always been a vital part of planning. Stephen King invented and published The Consumer’s Buying System in 1987 and in today’s technologically connected world, the complex buying process for most products and brands has meant that this tool is relevant now more than ever.

John Griffiths

The brief for the Sistine Chapel roof